With the #MeToo Campaign, What About Workplace Harassment?

Many Californians have been the victims of sexual harassment, and some may have participated in the online #metoo campaign. As stories abound in the media about powerful figures being accused of sexually harassing and assaulting women, some victims might wonder what they can do if they are being harassed at their jobs.

Handling Sexual Harassment at Work: What To Do

Workplace sexual harassment is a prohibited form of sex discrimination under both California and federal law. Despite the prohibitions against it, sexual harassment remains as a pervasive problem. People who are the victims may also not know what they can do when they are being harassed.

Some Part Time or New Workers May Not Be Eligible for FMLA Leave

Not every worker has rights to protections under the federal Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA). Rather, the benefit derives as such a right after a worker puts in some work time for a particular employer. Whether they are for medical issues that need healing time or the birth of a child or adoption where bonding time could be a grounds for FMLA leave, planning for meeting the time-worked requirement is key. The same is true of the California Family Rights Act.

Salary History and Offers of Employment

Job hunting in California and throughout the country is often a nerve-racking experience. In addition to having to sell oneself to an employer, job hunters are frequently asked a number of personal questions, including queries about previous salaries.

New Law Makes Gender Wage Information Public

In California, companies will soon be required to file information about gender wage differences. Starting on July 1, 2019, this information will be submitted biennially, and it will be published online for public viewing once proper protocols have been established. Specifically, employers required to comply with this requirement must show the difference between mean and median wages between male and female exempt employees.

The Fair Pay Act and Gender-Based Wage Discrimination

Wage discrimination based on the gender of employees is illegal in California. People whose jobs require similar work must be paid equal amounts as those of the opposite gender unless an exception applies. Under the Fair Pay Act, both private and public employers are prohibited from discriminating against workers in their pay on the basis of their genders.